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The online review, or the case of the disappearing opinion.

When each of us started playing the saxophone, it's highly probable that there was a player who inspired us with his or her sound. As we mature, many of us went out to find the magic reed or horn, or of course mouthpiece to help us on our way. How many jazz fans stared at the cover of Blue Train, and wondered how Trane got that brilliant sound on a ToneMaster? How many folks bought Guardala's because they were enamored of Mike Brecker's sound and so on, ad nauseum? I think a healthy curiosity is a necessary component of development at any age in any pursuit. Looking to the masters is how most all great artists developed. However, since the era of high speed internet there is a new pheno

1940's Berg Larsen mouthpieces: innovation in design.

The saxophone is not, strictly speaking, a musical instrument. It's an invention. The earliest people to use this technological device in an orchestral setting were sometimes referred to as 'operators' and the instrument itself was regarded somewhat as a novelty. Before you start getting mad at me, I'm aware that the history is of course more complicated than this and I don't consider myself an expert on this subjet. What I do know is that since then, the instrument has achieved acceptance in all manner of musical idiom including orchestral music. OK. What does this have to do with Berg Larsen mouthpieces? The connection is thematic, in that the spirit of the saxophone is very much inn

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Sebastian Knox Woodwind Services

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